Statistics on dating abuse

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Researchers and educators eager to stop violent patterns early — and reduce abuse not only among teens but among the adults they will become — already are testing programs that teach younger children and teens how to have healthier relationships.

But as they seek to understand why so many young people hit, demean or force sex on their partners, much remains unclear.

Dating violence often starts with teasing and name calling.

These behaviors are often thought to be a “normal” part of a relationship.

When you look at serious sexual and severe physical assault, we tend to see a bit more from the boys than the girls."Dorothy Espelage, a researcher at the University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign, says, "Without measures of fear, severity and injury, we need to be cautious" about interpreting the new nationwide survey results.Lead author Michele Ybarra, a researcher with the Center for Innovative Public Health Research in San Clemente, Calif., said in an e-mail that she could not discuss the study because it is under review for publication in a scientific journal.In general, data presented at a conference are not considered as authoritative as results reviewed by outside experts and then published.J.," and Melissa Torres, as "Angela," are shown during a rehearsal of "Don't U Luv Me," a play that explores the concept of violence in teen dating at North Plainfield High School in North Plainfield, N. More than a third of teen guys and girls say they've been physically, emotionally or sexually abused in their dating relationships, according to new, unpublished data from a nationwide survey.Similar numbers of both sexes say they've been abusers.

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